Scriptures

Names and Order of the Books of the Complete Peshitta

The Peshitta Old Testament is an ancient Aramaic translation of the original Hebrew Scriptures, pre-dating the Massoretic text. The books of the Peshitta differ significantly from that of the Massoretic text, and in some cases, certain verses are very different.

  • Genesis
  • Exodus
  • Leviticus
  • Numbers
  • Deuteronomy
  • Job
  • Joshua
  • Judges
  • 1 Samuel
  • 2 Samuel
  • Psalms
  • 1 Kings
  • 2 Kings
  • Proverbs
  • Wisdom
  • Ecclesiastes
  • Song of Songs
  • Isaiah
  • Jeremiah
  • Lamentations
  • Epistle of Jeremiah
  • Epistle of Baruch
  • Baruch
  • Ezekiel
  • Hosea
  • Joel
  • Amos
  • Obadiah
  • Jonah
  • Micah
  • Nahum
  • Habakkuk
  • Zephaniah
  • Haggai
  • Zechariah
  • Malachi
  • Daniel (with “Prayer of Azariah”, “Song of Three”)
  • Bel
  • The Dragon
  • Ruth
  • Susanna
  • Esther
  • Judith
  • Ben Sirach
  • 1 Chronicles
  • 2 Chronicles
  • Apocalypse of Baruch
  • 4 Ezra
  • Ezra
  • Nehemiah
  • 1 Maccabees
  • 2 Maccabees
  • 3 Maccabee
  • 4 Maccabees
  • Josephus, Wars of the Jews
  • Peshitta New Testament

    The Peshitta New Testament is the record of the Gospels, Acts of the Apostles and the Epistles written in the Aramaic of the time of Jesus Christ (Yeshua Mshikha), with the Greek being made available later. The Aramaic canon differs from that of the Greek.

    The canon of the New Testament is according to Mar Ebedyeshua. Concerning the New Testament canon, Mar Ebedyeshu adds Tatian’s Diatessaron and omits the book of Revelation. We read from The Nestorian Church: A Concise History of Nestorian Christianity in Asia from the Persian Schism to the Modern Assyrians, by Aubrey R. Vine (1937), page 188:

    “As to the Bible, under missionary influence they were tending to accept and use the canon of Western Christendom, though the true Syriac canon is somewhat smaller. Ebedyeshu, metropolitan of Nisibis, gives: the Four Gospels, Acts, the Epistle of James, i Peter, i John, fourteen Epistles of Paul (inclusive of Hebrews). He also adds the Diatessaron of Tatian. The most significant omission is the Apocalypse. Ebedyeshu’s list, apart from his apparent reauthorization of the Diatessaron, is the same as the canon of the Syriac Peshitta, which dates from about 420.”

    • Matthew
    • Mark
    • Luke
    • John
    • Diatessaron
    • Acts of the Apostles
    • James
    • 1 Peter
    • 1 John
    • Romans
  • 1 Corinthians
  • 2 Corinthians
  • Galatians
  • Ephesians
  • Philippians
  • Colossians
  • 1 Thessalonians
  • 2 Thessalonians
  • 1 Timothy
  • 2 Timothy
  • Titus
  • Philemon
  • Hebrews
  • Books of the Septuagint

    In short, the Septuagint is an ancient Greek translation of the Hebrew Scriptures.

    • Genesis
    • Exodus
    • Leviticus
    • Numbers
    • Deuteronomy
    • Joshua
    • Judges
    • Ruth
    • 1 Kings
    • 2 Kings
    • 3 Kings
    • 4 Kings
    • 1 Chronicles
    • 2 Chronicles
    • Ezra
    • 1 Esdras
    • Nehemiah
    • Tobit
    • Judith
    • Esther
    • 1 Maccabees
    • 2 Maccabees
  • 3 Maccabees
  • 4 Maccabees
  • Job
  • Psalms
  • Proverbs
  • Ecclesiastes
  • Song of Songs
  • Wisdom
  • Sirach
  • Esaias
  • Jeremias
  • Lamentations
  • Baruch
  • Jezekiel
  • Daniel
  • Osee
  • Joel
  • Amos
  • Obdias
  • Jonas
  • Michaeas
  • Naum
  • Ambacum
  • Sophonias
  • Aggaeus
  • Zacharias
  • Malachias
  • Other Texts
    The Eastern Rite includes the 1) Didache as a part of the Acts of the Apostles, and the 2) Gospel of St. Thomas.

    What are some of the best English translations of the Bible? Click here for an article on this topic.

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